The mongoose (La mangouste)

Mangouste
Origin

The mongoose is a small mammal living in southern Asia, Africa, and southern Europe, as well in Fiji, Puerto Rico, and some Caribbean and Hawaiian islands, where they are an introduced species.

Description

Mongooses are short-legged brown or grey animals with pointed noses, small round ears, and long furry tails. They are between 70 to 120 cm height and their lifetime can be up to 15 years. As an omnivore the mongoose generally eats reptiles, small others mammals such rats and mouse, shellfish, scorpion, amphibians, insects, fruits and also loves poultry. The mongoose is considered as a pet like a cat in some areas of India, it has the responsibility to kill rats and snakes in the house.

The mongoose in Guadeloupe Archipelago

The mongoose has been introduced in Guadeloupe Archipelago in 1888 in order to kill snakes and rats that were invading sugar cane plantations. Unfortunately, they were not as efficient as expected because they destroyed most of the small, ground-based fauna. Indeed, mongooses proliferate very quickly and threaten the survival of various native species, especially birds but also a lizard called Ameiva juliae and grass snakes. Following the big disaster mongooses have made in these islands, they are listed by the International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN) as the most invasive species in the top 100.

The mongoose is as quick as lightning which allows it to see oncoming predators with greater ease. When visiting Guadeloupe, you won’t be able to approach them but you won’t miss them for sure, just pay attention.

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